7 Misconceptions About Home Care

7 misconceptions about home care

There are many misconceptions about home care, but here we will cover the seven main misconceptions that seem to come up consistently with most new potential clients and their family.

The Many Misconceptions About Home Care

Home care is only for the sick.

While it is partially true that residential care is for a sickly or recovering individual, it is not always the case. There are four types of home care: home health care (provided by a licensed medical professional), non-medical care such as homemaker, personal care or companion. Home health care may be needed for such extremes as post-operation rehab, skilled assessments, teaching, speech therapy and other assistance. Non-medical care would involve daily activities such as cooking, cleaning, bathing and dressing.

It’s permanent.

Most individuals that need residential care usually assume that it is permanent and that they will lose their independence. A professional home care giver is responsible for being the individuals extra eyes and ears around the home. This helps prevent accidents such as falls, slips and spills that lead to serious injury. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the leading cause of injury-related death is due to imbalance in individuals over the age of 65.

It’s costly.

It is thought that home care isn’t affordable when in fact it is the most affordable option because of the flexible hourly service. In 2010, a survey showed that 22 percent of the networks employ home care service for only hours or less a week. Furthermore, 49 percent of family home caregivers overestimate the cost of non-medical related care but approximately $6.00 an hour.

No control over who comes to my home.

For the most part, each home caregiver is matched with a client that has similar interests. A company’s home caregivers should always be screened, insured, trained and bonded. A reputable company should always offer background checks at the time of the meeting set up. They should also offer steady and reliable backups or replacements for emergency purposes.

Caregivers don’t care about their clients.

A good residential care associate will take time to understand the client’s needs, listen thoroughly, establish a rapport and overall, make them feel at ease. To make it official, the agency should analyze the client’s needs to make sure that they are being placed correctly. If a client should feel that they are not being treated properly, the family needs to contact the agency immediately.

Only old people need home care.

Again, individuals with chronic illness, recovering from surgery or rehabilitation are welcome to and encouraged to rely on this kind of help. Even though home care is recognized but individuals over the age of 65, it is important that anyone in need of care should be able to get these services.

Basic hygiene clean up doesn’t qualify.

Whatever you may need that will be of help to you, you should be able to receive. Whether it is bathing or making the bed, it is best to find an agency that provides full service for all and any of your needs.

Should you need more information regarding misconceptions about home care or anything else home care related then contact us and we’ll help clear everything up.

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