7 Signs Your Senior Loved One Requires Additional Help

7 signs your senior loved one requires additional help

Sometimes, seniors experience abrupt shifts that require the implantation of additional help or support – such as a broken hip or a major illness. Other times, the road from “completely independent” to “needing assistance” occurs so gradually, it’s easy to miss the key warning signs until you become a family in crisis.

The best long-term care plans are those that are set up to provide minimal or part-time assistance in the form of driving, errand running, housecleaning, etc., and then scale up as age/health requires it.

Read, Helping Independent Elderly Loved Ones Stay Independent, for more along those lines.

7 Signs It’s Time To Acquire Additional Help

In the meantime, here are 7 key indicators it’s time to rally the troops, bring in outside support and/or create a more focused long-term care plan.

S/he’s more forgetful than usual

At first, forgetfulness is blamed on “senior brain,” and of course, there is some logic to this. However, repeat missed appointments, birthdays, bill payments, prescription refills, hair appointments, etc. are signs that something more is going on.

In addition to pursuing dementia screening by a professional healthcare provider, these 7 signs indicate that someone else (or multiple people) need to be brought in to support and provide additional help with the daily ins-and-outs.

Notable weight loss

Often, elders (with or without dementia) simply stop eating like they used to. Those who live alone can find it laborious to prepare meals every day or may not be able to drive to – or navigate – grocery stores anymore. Sometimes, underlying depression or other health conditions cause a decrease in weight and/or an appetite. Try to identify the cause of the weight loss and then move forward from there.

If shopping or meal preparation is an issue, support can be brought in. If a relative or friend isn’t able to help out with grocery shopping, it might be time to enlist support from senior meal services or a home care provider who can prepare nutritious “ready to heat/eat” meals and snacks.

Visit, Preventing Malnutrition in the Elderly, for ideas on how to support healthy, senior nutrition.

The house is unclean and/or a flat-out disaster

Like meal preparation, housekeeping becomes laborious for those who are weaker, are experiencing vision loss, have mobility issues, are afraid to stand on stepladders, etc. Having a neat, clean and orderly home is essential to senior health. In addition to sanitation issues, a cluttered, messy and/or unmaintained home poses safety risks.

First, do all you can to make the home safer and more accessible for seniors, focusing on steps to make the bathroom safe (it’s the most dangerous room in the house!). Find a reputable housecleaner in the area and help seniors connect with licensed professionals who can perform automatic, routine home maintenance. If you feel cognition is an issue or sense this is the beginning of a decline, a part-time care provider can handle most basic housekeeping and maintenance tasks.

There are notable hygiene issues

Is your once well-coiffed mother now looking more unkempt? Do you notice unpleasant body or poor hygiene-related odors? Feel sure clothing hasn’t been laundered in weeks? Do bed linens and towels appear grungy?

These are all signs that something is amiss – and that “something” can range from general loneliness and depression to full-blown health and/or cognition issues. All are worth a gentle discussion and the sign to look for outside support, assistance, and additional assistance via their physician’s assessment and/or a consultation with a home care provider.

The fridge and pantry contents are minimal to nonexistent

Take a peek into the fridge and pantry contents. If you consistently notice a lack of the basics, fresh fruit, and veggies or tasty, nutritious drinks and snacks – take action. If friends and family aren’t able to do regular grocery runs – and/or you’ve assessed meal prep is an issue – a homecare provider can take up the slack by shopping and preparing meals.

Bills aren’t being paid and/or notable discrepancies in financial statements

Forgetting to pay bills on a consistent basis is a dangerous sign; so, too, are notable discrepancies on financial statements. The former is easy to prevent, establishing automatic bill pay, etc. The former is often a sign of financial elder abuse – ranging from scams to nefarious relatives and “friends.”

Read, Protecting Seniors From Financial Abuse, to learn more about how to prevent, detect and handle signs of financial abuse. Additionally, this is a good time for you and family members to discuss things like Power of Attorney options and advanced directives.

Inexplicable and/or repeat dings, dents and automobile scrapes

Oh, boy. This one is often the most difficult to navigate at all because giving up the keys can seem impossible for many seniors. That being said, their safety – and the safety of others – is a top priority. If you suspect your senior isn’t a safe driver – schedule an appointment with the optometrist. A new prescription may be all s/he needs. If, however, it’s time to give up the keys, visit our post titled, How to Convince a Senior to Give up Driving.

Let Us Supply The Additional Help

Having a difficult time discerning whether or not your parent or senior loved one needs support or additional help? Schedule a consultation with a local home care provider. These no-obligation consults are instrumental in providing experienced, professional assessment, much-needed advice or tips, as well as the creation of a thoughtful, long-term care plan.

Be Sociable, Share!

Speak Your Mind

*