Compassion Fatigue vs Caregiver Burnout

compassion fatigue vs caregiver burnout

Caregiving can become a one-way, energetic street. This means the majority of the caregiver’s emotional and energetic resources funnel to their clients, without any chance for the caregiver to restore and recharge her/himself.  

In the beginning phases, this is referred to as compassion fatigue. Over time, if caregivers aren’t given the breaks they need to recharge their own batteries, it morphs into caregiver burnout – and that’s a dangerous destination. 

Enlisting the support of qualified respite care is the single best thing caregivers and their families can do to prevent fatigue or burnout.  

Compassion (Caregiver) Fatigue: Are you at risk?

Seniorlink.com defines caregiver fatigue as occurring: 

“…when the caregiver feels physically, emotionally, and physically exhausted, often leading to a change in attitude. Negative feelings toward the job and the care recipient often accompany the mind state, sometimes causing feelings of resentment.” 

Anyone who serves as a caregiver is at risk for compassion, or caregiver, fatigue. Parents of minor children often “suffer” from compassion fatigue at a certain level because so much of their energetic resources are poured into their families. In fact, those who find themselves in “the sandwich generation,” caring for children at home and aging parents, are, particularly at risk. 

Caregiving for someone who is chronically/terminally ill or a senior loved one/relative puts you at heightened risk for caregiver fatigue. Eventually, if you don’t find a way to meet your own needs, caregiver fatigue leads to burnout (more on that below).  

IMPORTANT NOTE: Caregivers are often the last to notice they’re experiencing caregiver fatigue because it can creep up on you. Read this article with your spouse, partner, and loved ones. If they recognize the signs of fatigue and potential caregiver burnout, they can help you get the support you need. 

Signs of Caregiver or Compassion Fatigue 

The most common signs of caregiver fatigue are: 

  • Constant feeling of exhaustion or lack of energy 
  • Difficulty focusing 
  • Trouble sleeping or falling asleep (the brain keeps racing) 
  • Missing or forgetting your personal or family appointments, obligations, extracurricular activities, etc. 
  • Withdrawal from family, friends, or activities you use to enjoy 
  • Unexpressed (repressed) feelings of anger, resentment, frustration 
  • Being short or terse with the ones you love (family, friends, and even the loved one you take care of my say, “You don’t seem like yourself…” 
  • A feeling that you are the only one who can do this job so you just need to buck up and do it (micromanaging/control/my way is the best way) 

That final bullet point is key. The truth is that while you may certainly be “the best” at taking care of the one you love, you are not the only one who can care for them. Letting go and allowing others to help is one of the best things you can do to prevent caregiver fatigue from becoming complete burnout. 

Caregiver Burnout: The end of the road 

Caregiver burnout is similar to fatigue in how it initially expresses itself, but everything is magnified. More specifically, the anger and resentment you feel towards the person requiring your care, and/or the people you feel should be helping out but aren’t. 

Signs of more severe burnout include: 

  • Complete insomnia 
  • Lack of interest in activities or people you used to enjoy 
  • Uncontrolled depression, anxiety, loneliness, etc. 
  • Rage, anger, resentment that comes out at those around you 
  • Headaches and stomach ailments 
  • Exacerbated health issues 
  • Feelings of complete suicide 
  • A desire to harm the person your taking care of and/or yourself 

Sadly, senior neglect and abuse are far more likely to occur if a caregiver is overwhelmed, depleted, and burned out.  

Self-Care Tips for Caregivers 

There are so many things you can do, both large and small, to nourish yourself and prevent fatigue and burnout.  

Create a caregiving schedule to help with compassion fatigue

Don’t start out being a full-time caregiver without a schedule that accommodates some days/times off. These allow you to rest, recharge, attend personal appointments/social engagements, etc. These days/times off are called “respite care shifts” and respite care is available in many forms: 

Nourish yourself in the day-to-day 

People see or hear the words, “self-care” and they immediately imagine massages, mani/pedis, or a weekend retreat. All of those are lovely, but the average spouse/parent/caregiver can’t take advantage of those luxuries on a regular basis.  

What you can do is take care of yourself on a daily basis via nourishing, healthy foods, deep breaths, gentle stretches (Click Here to “take” a FREE, 30-minute, restorative yoga class at home), taking a walkout in nature, etc. Make these non-negotiables in your routine and it will help to keep your body recharged and restored. 

Avoid stimulants 

It may be tempting to drink more coffee or caffeinated tea to give you energy on those slow, sluggish, or exhausting days. In fact, drinking caffeine or using other stimulants can prevent you from getting the rest and sleep you need. Plus, it fuels a higher heart rate and can exacerbate feelings of anxiety or an inability to focus. 

Sleep when your client/loved one sleeps 

When at all possible, nap when your client naps. Or, if you can’t sleep, at least lay or sit quietly while your mind and body relax and recharge. If you are taking care of someone with dementia/Alzheimer’s or demanding needs that make it impossible to catch up on house chores, explore options and have chores done by someone else so you can be attentive when the individual is awake and can rest easy when they’re sleeping – without the feeling that there are things you need to get done around the house. 

Take A Load Off And Give Us A Call

HomeAide Home Care is a licensed, Bay Area senior care agency that understands how important respite care is to the wellbeing of primary caregivers. Contact us to explore your options so we can help you prevent caregiver fatigue and burnout. Our in-home assessments are always free.

Home Care Agency vs Independent Caregiver

home care agency vs independent caregiver

Meta: Home care agencies offer benefits independent caregivers don’t, such as education/training, workman’s comp, flexibility, and qualified replacements time off. 

Once you notice the signs a parent or senior loved one needs more support; the hunt for the right caregiver is a logical next step. If you are bringing in a caregiver from outside the family network- either as the primary caregiver or to supplement family caregivers, you’ll have two options: hiring an independently advertised caregiver from a registry or hiring one from a licensed home care agency

There is a big difference between the two. And, while we understand that cost is one of the most significant factors determining who you hire, know there are always hidden costs associated with hiring an independent caregiver from a registry. 

Hiring From A Registry vs Hiring A Home Care Agency 

First, it’s crucial to establish the difference between the hiring processes themselves. 

Hiring from an online registry 

Searching for a caregiver from a registry takes multiple forms, including: 

  • Craigslist or “Help Wanted/Needed” adds 
  • Temp agency 
  • Professional staffing agency 
  • Referrals of private caregivers (or family members looking for work) from your social network 
  • Independent contracting agencies 
  • Private duty registry 

For safety and security purposes, we advise against hiring anyone via a Craigslist or other online format that offers no form of quality control. Seniors are vulnerable, far more prone to scams and fraud than other populations, so a high-level vetting process is essential before you let anyone into your home or your loved one’s life. 

While staffing agencies may do a basic check of a candidate’s employment history and referrals, they aren’t senior care experts. Also, they don’t typically run complete criminal background checks, DMV checks, etc., nor do they typically focus on candidates’ job history and references (who knows whether that “job reference” you called to verify was just their Uncle Bob, posing as a former boss?) 

Hiring a licensed home care agency 

When you contract with a licensed caregiving agency, you aren’t actually hiring anyone. You’re contracting with an agency, becoming a client, rather than a direct employer of their staff. 

In addition to working with caregivers who have a gift for working with seniors, you also benefit from the ability to work with Medicare-approved caregivers and to verify business licensing, Better Business Bureau ratings and reports, and other resources proving you’re working with high-quality care providers. 

We can’t emphasize enough the benefits of working with a Medicare-approved caregiving agency. That stamp of approval can become invaluable if/when your parents require care related to medical events or diagnoses, which may be covered by Medicare and private insurance coverage. 

Here are some of the other considerations when hiring independently or from a registry compared with working with an agency. 

Employer vs. Client 

As an employer, you’re beholden to regional, state, and federal employment laws. You simply can’t hire anyone “under-the-table” anymore, without facing potentially serious fines, penalties, and litigation. 

When hiring caregivers independently, you’ll need to think about: 

  • Taxes 
  • Social security payments 
  • Workers Comp/disability insurance 
  • Paid sick days, vacations, time off 
  • Health insurance, retirement, and other benefits 
  • Who will show up to fill in/takeover if the hired caregiver(s) don’t turn up, call in at the last minute, or quit in the middle of a shift? 

When you hire from an agency, you’re the agency’s client and they employ the caregivers. So, while their costs may seem higher at the outset, they’re typically far less than when you add a private caregiver’s independent wages with the additional taxes and benefits costs required of you. 

Not to mention, the business/logistics of being an employer is a lot to take on when you’re also managing aging parents’ needs with your own and your family’s needs. 

Safety and Security 

The caregivers working with qualified agencies are vetted via complete criminal background checks, employment verification, and thorough check-ins with references. Plus, because they work for agencies specializing in senior and memory care, they attend ongoing education, training, conferences, seminars, and skills reinforcement around home care, senior health, nutrition, etc. 

Not only are most independent caregivers devoid of those qualifications (never accept a candidate-provided credit or background check!), you are responsible for their continuing education and training so they can keep up with the senior’s changing needs with knowledge, expertise, and professional etiquette. 

The level of education, training, and care available from an agency cannot be compared with the large majority of private or independent registry offerings. 

Costs & Out-of-Pocket Payment 

We spoke above that the costs associated with private caregivers often winds up being much higher, and for lower-quality care. As payingforseniorcare.com states, “Aging Americans are struggling to pay for assisted living, home care and other forms of long term care.” 

Keeping the long-term view of the costs associated with senior care is important. For example, there are multiple ways to cover these costs, including VA benefits, liquidating properties or assets that aren’t in use, Medicare coverage, or working with a financial advisor to use retirement or reverse mortgage options to subsidize at-home care. 

Supervision & Monitoring 

As an employer, you’re responsible for the supervision and monitoring of your caregiver employee. Assigning tasks, creating systems to monitor and evaluate they’re doing what they were hired to do, and you’re also responsible for discipline when job performance is sub-par or worse. 

Agency caregivers are monitored by their employers, and software and apps ensure there is a digital track record of tasks assigned/completed, communication between you the client/ caregiver-agency, any red flags, as well as caregiver’s assessment of how services/offerings can best be tailored to the senior’s evolving needs. 

If/when a caregiver requires discipline, requires removal from an assignment, fails to show up for work, etc., the agency automatically sends a qualified and situation-appropriate caregiving replacement to immediately step in until a permanent replacement is found. That’s a much harder scenario to handle if you hire a caregiver on your own. 

If you’re searching for qualified senior caregivers to support a senior loved one’s independence, consider scheduling assessments with at least three, separate agencies in your area to learn more about what’s available, their qualifications, and to feel out which one feels best-suited for the senior client. 

We’re Here For You

Interested in learning more about the benefits of using a licensed home care agency? Contact us here at HomeAide Home Care, Inc. and schedule a free, in-home assessment. There is no obligation and we’ll answer all of your questions, and provide valuable information, about how to age at home with grace, safety, and dignity

The Benefits Of Spending Time With Grandparents

the benefits of spending time with grandparents

One of the reasons we initially started a senior home care agency in the Bay Area was because we love seniors, and we know how important human engagement is for their health and wellbeing. Not surprisingly, it turns out that spending time with grandparents is just as beneficial for the third- and fourth generations. 

Until relatively recently in western culture, spending time with grandparents was a given because families either lived in multigenerational households or grandparents lived close by. Now, in a time when grandparents may live on another coast – or another country – our children miss out on crucial opportunities to develop their intelligence in all capacities and to build essential bonds with their elders. 

Spending Time With Grandparents

Here are nine sweet reasons why your children benefit from spending quality time with their grandparents. 

It builds more emotional intelligence  

Single-working parent households were largely the norm, or one parent was able to bring work into the house, keeping children with them outside of school schedules. Today, increasing numbers of children spend their first several years in daycare facilities. Regardless of how wonderful they are, a daycare provider can never fill the space that a parent or grandparent occupies in a child’s life. 

So, it makes sense that studies show children who spend more time with their grandparents have fewer emotional/behavioral problems and score higher on emotional intelligence assessments. 

They smile and laugh more often 

It’s a given that the grandparent role is a special one. In the best-case scenarios, grandparents get to serve as an unconditionally loving family member who has just slightly looser ties on the child than his/her parents. Grandparents are often retired or only work full time, have more time on their hands and are eager to share focused time and energy with their grandchildren. 

As a result, grandparents have that magical ability to make children laugh, smile, and be more silly – more often. That leads to a happier and more joy-filled child. That same interaction also makes for happier, healthier seniors. 

Encourages more positive social behavior 

A recent study evaluated 10 – to 14-year-olds from both single- and two-parent households. The number of parents didn’t seem to affect social and academic performance as much as the researchers expected it to. However, children who had more regular interactions with their grandparents were more empathetic and compassionate in social settings, and they were generally more engaged in school.  

They are less likely to become depressed 

Worried your child, tween, or teen is having a hard time socially or could be battling depression? It might be time to schedule an evening, weekend, or holiday visit with grandma and/or grandpa. Children who report having a close relationship with their grandparents are less likely to experience symptoms of depression.  

Among other things, children may feel more comfortable sharing their feelings, or being comforted by their grandparents. And, because seniors are prone to loneliness and depression, they are able to sympathize and express their understanding of where the children are coming from, which helps children feel more seen and heard. 

Children forge a deeper connection with their family history and culture 

Grandparents have long been considered the story keepers in any family line. The more time a child spends with his/her grandparents or great grandparents, the more likely s/he is to see photos and albums, watch old family movies, and to hear stories that connect them to their lineage. This is particularly important for second- and third-generation immigrants who may have a less direct connection to their cultural ties. 

It can help children have a stronger bond with their parents 

Having a hard time with your adolescent? A visit with the grandparents is a great idea. In addition to giving you and your child a break, odds are s/he’ll hear lots of stories about how you were growing up – many of which you may not remember or don’t have the “parent’s perspective” about.  

Hearing about your funny, silly, surprising, or similar escapades may benefit you, too, because your child will return with a greater understanding (and bond) with your past. 

Spending time with grandparents boosts oxytocin levels (the love hormone) with cuddles 

Oxytocin is one of the “love hormones,” facilitating feelings of emotional warmth, comfort, relaxation, and connectedness. Known as a bonding hormone, oxytocin is released when we hug, cuddle, and share affectionate touch. Since grandparents are likely to have more time to snuggle on the couch, read a book, or reach out and give a gentle, long hug, your child will experience boosts in oxytocin – and all of its physical and emotional benefits. 

They can grow their skill sets 

Feel like your kids are spending way too much time on their phones, gadgets, or in front of screens – and not enough time developing their skills? Odds are one or more of your parents, step-parents or in-laws have skills they are eager to pass down. And, your child is more likely to say yes to learning woodworking, handwork, yard work, and gardening, etc., when it’s offered up by Nana or gramps. 

Ample, unconditional love 

Everyone benefits from unconditional love, and the more of it, the better. While parents are typically the go-to providers of unconditional love, experiencing it from grandparents and extended senior family members give children the opportunity to learn multidimensional examples of what unconditional love really is.  

These are just some of the many benefits of spending time with grandparents. If possible, try to find a way to connect your children with their grandparent(s), and vice versa. It’s a win-win in every way. 

We’re Here To Help

Have a parent with mobility issues or a diagnosis that makes it harder for them to spend time with their grandchildren without help? Contact us here at HomeAide Home Care and we can connect you with just the right companion, driver, or helper to facilitate their precious bonding time.

The Importance Of Oral Hygiene In The Elderly

the importance of oral hygiene in the elderly

Taking on the role of caregiver for senior loved ones is challenging (major understatement!). It’s easy for things like oral hygiene and routine dental appointments to take a back burner as other, more immediate issues are addressed.  

However, oral health is increasingly a focus for senior healthcare providers as we learn more about gum disease and tooth decay, and their link to serious health complications. 

Oral Hygiene And Dental Care Begin At Home 

While dentist appointments are important, oral hygiene and dental care begin at home. If your senior loved one requires medication reminders, s/he might also benefit from brushing/flossing reminders. Both of which should happen at least two – if not three – times per day. 

Adequate nutrition is another staple of healthy teeth and gums – and healthy teeth and gums rely on adequate nutrition to keep them strong. It can present a conundrum. If you notice the fridge and cupboards are bare, check the medicine cabinet and see if there are a nice, fresh toothbrush and visible signs the toothpaste is used regularly. 

Consider adding meal support into the weekly plan, and talk about other senior caregiving services that might keep your loved one living at home independently, while still meeting their daily needs. Replace toothbrushes as needed (every season is a good reminder…) 

7 Reasons Oral Hygiene And Dental Health Is A Priority For Seniors 

The irony is that seniors are more prone to dry mouth, forgetting to brush their teeth, and malnourishment than younger sectors of the population. Yet, it can be more difficult for seniors to get to the dentist – particularly when they live alone, no longer drive, or have a hard time making/remembering their appointments.  

Also, seniors are the most likely demographic to have bridges or dentures, which require regular cleaning, maintenance and “fit-checks” to ensure they’re working well and have a comfortable fit.  

Just as it’s essential to keep in touch with your parent’s doctor(s), it’s equally important to communicate with their dentist to ensure they’re making – and keeping – their appointments.  

Here are seven good reasons why oral health is so important for seniors: 

Gum disease is linked to heart disease 

Seniors with gum disease and/or rotting teeth are linked to higher rates of heart disease, as well as strokes. The American Academy of Periodontology states that adults with gum disease are twice as likely to have heart disease than their peers with healthy teeth and gums. 

It prevents dementia and cognitive decline 

Some studies show that individuals with severe gum disease are more likely to develop dementia. This is a result of chronic inflammation that exacerbates existing Alzheimer’s/dementia – or that continuous inflammation might catalyze their onset.  

Seniors are more prone to dry mouth 

Seniors are more prone to dry mouth because of the medications they take and because they can easily suffer from dehydration. Seniors taking diuretics may intentionally drink less to prevent the more frequent urge to urinate. Unfortunately, dry mouth elevates the risk of gum disease. Find ways to encourage senior loved ones to drink more fluids, and schedule more frequent dental appointments if dry mouth is an issue. 

Good oral hygiene is a diabetes management tool

Is your parent currently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or at risk for developing it? Periodontitis, or severe gum disease, actually hinder the body’s natural ability to make insulin. If it is already in a diabetic state, blood sugar levels become even more difficult to manage in combination with gum disease. The American Dental Association states, “As with all infections, serious gum disease may cause blood sugar to rise. This makes diabetes harder to control because you are more susceptible to infections and are less able to fight the bacteria invading the gums.” 

Prevent a bad denture fit 

The ultimate goal is to keep as many of your own teeth as possible, avoiding the need for dentures. If, however, teeth must be pulled – oral health is even more important in some ways. If dentures aren’t cleaned regularly and maintained to keep a good, comfortable fit, senior nutrition suffers. Also, poorly fitting dentures cause swelling, sores, and gum infection that are incredibly painful and debilitating. 

Minimize the risk of root decay

If the tooth is rotted enough, or the gums are receded enough to expose tooth roots, the root starts to decay. This is bad news. While a root canal may be able to treat a minor to moderate infection, severe infection or decay results in pulling the tooth. 

Avoid catching pneumonia 

Seniors with gum disease are more likely to develop pneumonia, which is a leading cause of death in the elderly population. The same bacteria that build up in the teeth and gums, causing gum disease, can be breathed into the lungs. Once there, they settle in and can cause respiratory infections, including pneumonia. 

Don’t let a simple thing like not brushing his/her teeth or missing dental appointments catalyze malnourishment, poor health, or an unnecessary hospital stay.  

Need Help?

Need support getting a senior loved one to and from appointments? Feel like grocery shopping or meal preparations would help a parent eat better and more often? Contact us here at HomeAide Home Care and schedule a free, in-home assessment to learn more about our senior care services. 

The Benefits Of Aromatherapy On The Elderly

the benefits of aromatherapy on the elderly

Sometimes we get so focused on the nuts-and-bolts of senior care, such as diet and meal support, or ensuring their home is safe and accessible – we forget about the peripheral ways to support elderly family members and clients. Aromatherapy offers multiple benefits for seniors, as well as their caregivers. 

Aromatherapy can be used for relaxation and sleep support, for pain relief or to relieve inflammation, to improve the mood, or to infuse our living spaces with favorite smells. 

Integrate Aromatherapy Into Your Senior Care Plan 

Here are some of the ways to integrate aromatherapy into your senior care plan.  

Start with an aromatherapy diffuser 

Perhaps one of the simplest and easiest ways to use aromatherapy is to diffuse appealing scents into a room. Diffusers are affordable, and our favorites are the ones that utilize a liquid humidifier to distribute the smell. Those are especially beneficial this time of year when the air tends to be drier. Moisture-based diffusers also aid in relieving chest congestion and dry sinus passages, another common ailment for seniors since they are easily dehydrated

Visit mindbodygreen.com’s post, Essential Oil Diffusion: Everything You Need to Know, for more information, and to decide which diffuser style is best for you.  

Mood elevation 

Finally, aromatherapy can support mood elevation, helping to relieve depression and anxiety. The diffuser is an ally hear as well since the continued inhalation of the oils typically has the most strong effect on mood-boosting. Read Medical News Daily’s post on Essential Oils for Depression, which includes evidence from clinical studies.  

Oils to consider to alleviate depression, and elevate the mood, are: 

  • Lavender 
  • Bergamot 
  • Yuzu 
  • Rose otto 
  • Roman chamomile geranium 
  • Sage 
  • Jasmine 
  • Rosemary 

Boost immunity 

Once you connect with a local health food store that carries essential oils or a qualified aromatherapy specialist, you’ll have access to a wealth of information about scents and their specific benefits. 

Essential oils come in various formats and types, used in diffusers, added to smoothies, rubbed onto the skin or ingested in pellet form (never consume an essential oil unless you’ve checked the product with your senior’s healthcare provider) to boost immunity. Diffused versions are making their way into schools, offices, and other public buildings in addition to homes. 

Some of the most common essential oils for immunity-boosting purposes are lavender, lemon, eucalyptus (helpful for stuffy/congestion), rosemary, tea tree, clove, and others. You can also look for immunity boosting-specific blends, such as On GuardThieves Blend, or Immunity

Relieve arthritis pain and inflammation 

There are different grades and types of essential oils, and some of them can be applied topically, mixed with a carrier oil (coconut, almond, olive, etc.), or blended into a salve. When applied topically, they relieve pain and inflammation without the use of harsh or synthetic chemicals. Plus, the scents are often less intrusive, and more appealing than many OTC products. 

Read this Eden Garden article, Should I Diffuse or Topically Apply Essential Oil, to review the difference. Again, it’s worthwhile to check into a local health food store or herbal apothecary when you are first starting out. Essential oils are distilled and very potent, so you only want to apply essential oils that are specifically intended for topical application, or it can lead to itching, a burning sensation, or an undesirable skin reaction

Aiding digestion 

The combination of aging and medication reactions/side-effects can negatively impact digestion. You can mix essential oils such as marjoram, ginger, chamomile, or digestion-specific blends into a carrier oil and gently massage it right onto the abdomen. This provides comfort and can relieve indigestion. 

Stress relief, relaxation, and sleep support 

Another popular benefit of aromatherapy for seniors and their caregivers is stress relief, relaxation, and sleep support. Typically, diffusers are the best ways to administer essential oils for relaxation, to reduce stress or to support sleep because inhaling them provides quick access to the nervous system. 

Some of the essential oils known for their relaxing and sleep-supportive properties are: 

  • Lavender 
  • Valerian 
  • Clary sage 
  • Sweet marjoram 
  • Roman Chamomile 
  • Bergamot 
  • Ylang Ylang 
  • Sleep- or relaxation-specific blends 

When mixed with a carrier oil, these can be gently rubbed and massaged into the feet, hands, shoulders, back, forehead, etc., which provides double the relaxing benefits. 

Improve mental alertness 

While essential oils can reverse dementia or Alzheimer’s, certain oils and their scents boost mental alertness. Some of these include lemon and lemongrass, rosemary, peppermint, basil, and clementine. As with other target-benefits, there are also blends available to promote mental alertness, focus, and concentration.  

Notice that the bulk of the oils associated with mental alertness are found in the garden? Consider adding aromatic herbs and citrus fruits into the garden plan. The leaves or flesh of the fruit can be pressed between the fingers and inhaled right from the garden. 

The good news is that aromatherapy for seniors also benefits their caregivers too, many of whom suffer from similar ailments due to the hard work and energy demands associated with caregiving. 

Call Us For A Free Assessment

Are you interested in working with a senior home care agency that provides the full-spectrum of senior-centered support? Contact the team here at HomeAide Home Care. We provide licensed caregivers and personalized care in homes, assisted living facilities, and nursing homes.

Arthritis Diet: What To Eat And What To Avoid

arthritis diet what to eat and what to avoid

Did you know the foods you eat can worsen your arthritis pain and inflammation? Adhering to an arthritis diet – nearly identical to an anti-inflammatory diet – can make a substantial difference in the swelling, stiffness, and pain commonly associated with arthritis. 

Whether you’re a senior, or you’re caregiving for a senior loved one in your life, it’s almost inevitable that arthritis will become a factor in your life at some point. According to USpharmacist.com, “OA is the leading cause of disability in individuals older than 65 years and affects 70% to 90% of those older than 75 years.” 

Knowing that it makes sense that any adults, 50 years and older, begin focusing on foods that reduce arthritis symptoms and flare-ups as a proactive self-care option. 

What Is An Arthritis Diet? 

The good news is that while an arthritis diet includes the dreaded word, “diet,” it is quite expansive and has far more to do with what you should be eating, than what you shouldn’t. Similarly, the foods and beverages known to increase inflammation, which exacerbates arthritis, are also triggers for a range of senior-related health conditions such as heart disease, high cholesterol, and type 2 diabetes.  

When you follow the dietary guidelines outlined by The Arthritis Foundation, you benefit your body in exponential ways. 

In a nutshell 

In a nutshell, the arthritis diet operates on the premise that “following a diet low in processed foods and saturated fat and rich in fruits, vegetables, fish, nuts and beans is great for your body.” 

In that way, the diet shares the same principles of the Mediterranean Diet, or the anti-inflammatory diet listed above. And, the great news is that while you may have to cut down on some of those sweet treats, there are plenty of delicious food products that are yours for the eating. 

Foods To Avoid (because they “feed” inflammation) 

The foods to avoid are pretty straightforward. They are the foods or beverages that “feed” inflammation, which leads to increase swelling, redness, stiffness, and joint pain. Chronic inflammation also compromises the immune system. 

The 9 food or beverage items most likely to trigger inflammation are: 

  • Sugar (this includes high-fructose corn syrup, cane sugar, fructose, sucrose, anything with an –ose suffix). Instead, switch to stevia, agave, or other sweeteners rated lower on the glycemic index
  • Saturated fats 
  • Trans fats 
  • Omega 6 Fatty Acids. While Omega 6s are essential in moderation, they’re toxic in large quantities or when out of balance with their Omega 3 companions. Omega 6s are found in most vegetable oils (so stick with olive oil) as well as mayonnaise and most salad dressings. 
  • White flour products (refined carbohydrates). 
  • MSG 
  • Gluten and casein (found in wheat and other grain products)  
  • Aspartame (the sweetener found in most sugar-free or diet products) 
  • Alcohol. Swapping out your favorite happy hour drink with one of our Mocktail Recipes can help you reduce your alcohol intake. 

While you don’t need to eliminate any of these items completely (unless your physician(s) states otherwise), taking stock and minimizing their intake can provide an immediate reduction in arthritis-related symptoms. 

Foods To Focus On 

Now, let’s move to the positive – the foods that taste great and are known to reduce inflammation (anti-inflammatory).  

Ultimately, it’s about consuming lots and lots of fresh fruits and veggies – preferably those grown locally and in season, so you benefit from maximum nutrients and flavor.  

The 12 best foods for arthritis, are: 

  • Fish. Particularly those high in Omega 3s, such as salmon, mackerel, sardines, and herring. 
  • Soy. Also high in Omega 3s, it’s best to use fresh soybeans, edamame or tofu. 
  • Healthy oils. Especially those high in Omega 3s, including extra-virgin olive, avocado, safflower, and walnut oils. 
  • Cherries 
  • Low-fat dairy products (milk, cheese, and yogurt) 
  • Broccoli 
  • Green tea 
  • Citrus Fruits 
  • Whole grain. As we mentioned above, swap whole grains and whole-wheat flour for processed white flours anywhere you can 
  • Beans 
  • Garlic 
  • Nuts. Lightly salted nuts are a healthier alternative to chips or crackers and they’re good for you, too. 

Visit arthritis.org’s post on these 12 Best Foods for Arthritis for more specifics about the ways these food items interact positively with your body to reduce inflammation. 

Need help with arthritis-specific meal support? 

There’s no denying that eating well, and regularly, is more challenging for seniors. From mobility issues to the energy and work required to shop for – and cook – meals, bare cupboards and an excess of processed snacks is one of the most common signs that seniors need more support to remain independently at home

Feeling Overwhelmed?

HomeAide Home Care provides meal support, grocery shopping and errand running, companionship services and other key home care services that help senior loved ones adhere to an arthritis diet. Contact us to learn more or to schedule a free, in-home assessment. 

Senior Health And Wellbeing Depends On Social Interaction

senior health and wellbeing depends on social interaction

Social spheres shrink rapidly for seniors who don’t remain engaged in the world around them. Living alone, losing the ability to drive, decreased mobility, and inevitable side effects of aging – such as vision and hearing loss – make it more difficult for seniors to remain social.

However, research continues to correlate that senior health, quality of life, and longevity are directly proportional to social interaction and community engagement.

Social seniors are healthier seniors – and they live longer, too!

An article by Harvard.edu titled, Social Engagement and Healthy Aging, begins, “A rich web of human relationships enhances your health and stimulates your mind and memory.”

That’s a succinct way to express the myriad of correlations researchers are learning about senior health and its dependence on social interaction and engagement.

For example, the National Institute on Aging shares that seniors who are more socially connected:

  • Have more positive health biomarkers
  • have lower decreased levels of an inflammatory factor associated with Alzheimer’s, osteoporosis, arthritis, and other age-related conditions)
  • Have healthier appetites and report leading happier, more active lifestyles
  • Are less likely to suffer from loneliness, depression, and anxiety
  • Have longer lifespans, with a higher quality of life

The bottom line is that our senior loved ones need to be brought back into the fold, front-and-center, so they can feel loved, needed, wanted, and essential to the “village” as a whole.

Ideas for Keeping Seniors Socially Connected

There is a myriad of ways to keep senior loved ones socially connected and active within and around their communities. The following are just the tip of the iceberg. We also recommend consulting with your local senior center or an experienced senior home care agency to learn more about the opportunities that abound in your area.

Keep them mobile – on foot or by wheels

Mobility is key to seniors feeling independent, which allows them to be active.

There are a few tenets to ensuring seniors can get around independently:

The ability to get where you need to go means the world when it comes to remaining social, particularly when seniors live alone. Dependable transportation means seniors can keep saying, “Yes!,” to the things they’ve always done – church, self-care appointments, meals with friends, community events, etc.

Connect them with local volunteer opportunities

It’s harder to feel needed, productive, and like your life has meaning when you spend most of your time alone in your home. However, community volunteer opportunities are everywhere. Most schools, non-profits, libraries, homeless shelters, pet shelters, etc., are hungry for people who have the time and reliable interest to help out.

Visit our post, Volunteer Opportunities for Seniors are a Win-Win for Everyone, to learn more about how seniors, family members, and/or caregivers can get involved.

Join a senior exercise class for social interaction

Talk about a twofer; joining a senior exercise class, be it yoga, dance class, water aerobics, spinning – or whatever activities they’re drawn to – gets seniors moving and connected with local peers. This often creates opportunities for further socializing via tea or lunch before/after class, invitations to other gatherings or events, or a good conversation and laugh before heading back home.

Involve them in family activities, holidays, and outings

So, your grandma used to be the hostess for the holidays, but now she’s relegated to a corner of the room to visit with others? If this is what she wants to do, fine. However, there may be other roles for the seniors in your life over the course of holidays and family activities – you just need to check-in and see what they’d like to do.

Being a seated sous-chef, prepping the veggies may be a better fit. Maybe you need to have some photos labeled or organized? Could they teach the grandkids a dance from their era? Finally – don’t forget to ask if they’d like to come along to school plays, movies, occasional family meals (or pack food up and bring it to their house) – all of which keep them feeling included and getting more social interaction.

Companion services

Do you live far away from your senior loved ones? Does a busy work and family schedule make it difficult to include your parents or grandparents the way you’d like to? Companion services may be just the thing. In addition to weekly or more frequent visits from a professional caregiver and companion, you gain peace of mind knowing they’ll stay on top of any signs your loved one needs more support. Caregivers also provide transportation, meal support, and help come up with ideas to keep their clients engaged.

We Can Help With Social Interaction

Contact us here at HomeAide Home Care to learn more about optimizing social interaction and community engagement for the beloved senior(s) in your life.

Combatting Depression In The Elderly

combatting depression in the elderly

While it’s true that depression and feelings of loneliness are common in the senior population, there is much we can do to minimize or prevent these feelings. The first step is taking care of primary care needs, ensuring there aren’t physical factors at work such as an undiagnosed medical condition, negative side-effects from medication(s), or that something as simple as dehydration or malnutrition isn’t at work.

Then you can move on to other, proactive ideas to promote positive thoughts and emotions, regular human contact, social interactions, and participation in activities your loved one enjoys.

A Step-By-Step On Combatting Depression

Depression can affect anyone at any age. So, here are 5 steps to take when you think the elderly person in your life has depression.

Step 1: Find a physician who specializes in geriatric medicine

If your senior loved one has a true connection with his/her current physician that’s fine. However, that may not be the case. If the relationship isn’t positive, or feels more like “business as usual,” than true “healthcare” – shop around.

The baby boomer generation’s progression into the golden years has created a more significant number of physicians specializing in geriatric care. Check-in with the insurance carrier, ask friends and family or have a conversation with the local senior center to see if they have any referrals or recommendations. You can also search online.

Then, schedule an appointment for a general physical, to express any concerns you may have, and to run through the patient’s current medical history and prescriptions. See if anything shows up as a potential contributor to your loved one’s depression or anxiety.

Read, Communicating with Your Elderly Parent’s Doctor, for tips and strategies on how to stay in touch and engaged with your parent’s healthcare provider(s).

Step 2: Ensure basic needs are met

If you aren’t physically able to visit an aging parent or grandparent, they may be “shining you on” when you speak to them on the phone. If you live far away, we highly recommend scheduling a visit or having someone you know in the area perform a “wellness check.” Read, 7 Signs Your Senior Loved One Needs Help, to learn more about the “red flags” indicating support needs to be brought in.

You may determine it’s time to enlist the help of a licensed caregiving agency to send someone in once or more a week to check-in, offer companionship, run errands or for grocery and meal planning services. Ultimately, these services are tailored to the senior’s needs, and services can be augmented or shifted as time goes on.

Step 3: Honor their sadness and grief

We want to be clear that combatting depression or feelings of sadness doesn’t mean “just hoping they’ll go away.” Seniors are processing decades of life grief, trauma, and loss. The loss of a spouse and members their close friend groups or peers creates more loss and grief. It’s important for them to find ways to express those feelings – whether that is with you, a support group, a caregiver, a therapist, or all-of-the-above.

Studies show that reminiscence therapy alleviates depression and angst in seniors with dementia, and it’s just as helpful for seniors without it.

Step 4: Keep seniors active and engaged in their community

When you consider the list of things that happen when we age (vision/hearing loss, mobility loss, inability to do the things we love without help, etc.), it’s no wonder seniors get depressed. The key is to ensure that they remain active and engaged, doing the things they love to the best of their ability.

Do all you can to ensure your senior has access to:

Step 5: Help them feel wanted, needed and productive

Seniors living alone often feel as if their life has little to no value, and that’s a depressing thought for anyone. There are plenty of ways to combat that mentality, and it involves some action on your part or that of a caregiver. First, try to involve seniors in your household’s seasonal rhythm and activities so they are more than just a guest. Second, all that extra time on their hands can be put to good use in the community via volunteer hours. Read, Volunteer Opportunities for Seniors are a Win-Win for Everyone, for tips on how to get your senior involved.

Combatting Depression Is Something We Can Help With

Does it feel like companionship or professional caregiver support would help to combat depression for your senior loved one? Contact us here at HomeAide Home Care to schedule an in-home assessment and consultation. These meetings are always free, no-strings-attached, and are a valuable way to learn more about how to create longterm care plans for seniors desiring to age-in-place as independently – and contentedly – as possible.

How COPD Affects Aging And What Caregivers Can Do

how copd affects aging and what caregivers can do

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) affects roughly 11 million people in the United States and is now the third-leading cause of death by disease in this country. In a recent AJMC post (March, 2019), researchers stated, “It could be strongly argued that, due to the production of constant stresses that induce cell damage and eventual senescence, COPD might be directly responsible for accelerating aging, with all in untoward effects, rather than being a consequence of aging.”

This is important information for both patients with COPD and their caregivers to know, allowing care for those with COPD to follow a trajectory that is more closely in alignment with someone older than themselves, in order to provide the best quality of healthcare – and improved quality of life.

In addition to following medical recommendations for respiratory therapy, medication support, routine checkups, and various treatments, attention to diet, exercise, sleep habits, and social-emotional wellbeing can help combat the accelerated aging process associated with COPD.

A Shift From Hospital Care to Homecare Seems Inevitable for Those with COPD

In another study, targeting how to support home care for those with COPD, authors write:

Healthcare systems should support patients with COPD in achieving an optimal quality of life while limiting the costs of care. As a consequence, a shift from hospital care to home care seems inevitable. Therefore, patients will have to rely to a greater extent on informal caregivers. Patients with COPD as well as their informal caregivers are confronted with multiple limitations in activities of daily living. The presence of an informal caregiver is important to provide practical help and emotional support. However, caregivers can be overprotective, which can make patients more dependent. Informal caregiving may lead to symptoms of anxiety, depression, social isolation and a changed relationship with the patient. The caregivers’ subjective burden is a major determinant of the impact of caregiving. Therefore, the caregiver’s perception of the patient’s health is an important factor.

In most cases, informal caregivers (spouse, partner, child, grandchild) are the primary supports for those with COPD, and this dynamic relationship requires a thoughtful and diligent long-term health plan to optimize health and quality of life for the patient, while simultaneously supporting and facilitating strong, healthy relationships between patient and caregiver(s).

Improving Quality of Life and Health

Of course, the primary tenet in caring for someone with COPD is to ensure s/he observes:

  • Routine doctors’ appointments
  • Occupational or physical therapy appointments (including respiratory clinics and exercise classes offered by your local healthcare agencies to support respiratory health)
  • Taking prescription medications as prescribed

However, there are plenty of things you can do at home to promote better physiologic wellbeing, which directly translates to better mental and emotional wellbeing

Focus on an anti-inflammatory diet

Systemic inflammation is a byproduct of COPD, the result of respiratory tract agitation as well as declined respiratory function. Susceptibility to respiratory illnesses takes its toll on the immune system, which can further activate chronic inflammation.

Multiple studies have shown a correlation between specific diets and improved lung function in those with COPD. Diets that seem to have the best impact on preventing COPD, or improving lung/respiratory after a COPD diagnosis are those that emphasize:

  • Lean proteins
  • Lots of fruit and vegetables
  • Complex carbohydrates
  • Potassium-rich foods
  • Healthy fats
  • Minimal intake or elimination of processed foods and sugars

Researchers found anti-inflammatory diet models have multi-fold benefits for those with COPD and their caregivers.

Prevent dehydration (and focus on water)

Dehydration thickens mucus, which taxes the respiratory system. The Lung Institute states, “…drinking enough water can thin mucus and make mucus easier to clear out from the lungs.”By making water the hydration beverage of choice, those with COPD help to wash excess or thickened mucous through the system, rather than having to cough it up and get it out. And, it thins the mucus produced in the lungs and sinuses, making it easier to drain.

Read, Encourage Fluids to Keep Hydrated, for more information.

Keep moving – even if you’re house- or chair-bound

It’s hard to be motivated to exercise when shortness of breath or coughing are attached to physical exertion. Homebound patients with COPD can find ways to keep moving, even when more standard modes of exercise are no longer possible. Visit, Exercises For Homebound Seniors, for ideas on how less mobile seniors can safely exercise.

Provide independent access to activities, outings and social engagement

If COPD forces your spouse, parent or family member into early retirement, or requires a retirement from formerly-favorite activities, do all you can to support independence on your end. From creating more accessible living spaces that optimize safe mobility to setting up driving services or transportation options so your loved one can get around – the more engaged and active the person is in their own right, the better mental and emotional outlook they’ll have.

Respite Care is Key For Spouse and Family Caregivers

Finally, it’s essential that you create a respite care plan so your relationship as a caregiver doesn’t negatively impact your personal relationship. Get friends and family involved as much as possible. Don’t forget that respite care is also available from professional home care agencies, allowing you a day or two off per week – or a few hours off each day – so everyone gets the much-needed breaks they deserve.

HomeAide Home Care, Inc. is a licensed and experienced home care provider here in Alameda and the greater Bay Area. We have decades of experience supporting a positive and sustainable homecare plan for clients with COPD and their families. Contact Us to learn more.

Reducing Anger In Those With Dementia

reducing anger in those with dementia

Reducing anger can quickly become the number one issue for caregivers because while some individuals with Alzheimer’s or dementia remain content and amiable for the rest of their lives, others can seem as if they’ve experienced a personality transplant. After short-term memory loss, excessive anger, frustration, and even violence may be some of the most notable signs or symptoms of dementia. And, emotional outbursts may exacerbate over time. This is heartbreaking for spouses, family members and loved ones, as well as their immediate caregivers.

5 Tips For Reducing Anger & Aggression In Those With Dementia

Reducing anger and aggressive episode in those with dementia improves quality of life for the patient, as well as those who love them and are involved in their care plan. In cases where anger results in more serious aggression or violence, it is essential for the safety and wellbeing of all involved that you find a way to provide safe, 24-hour care.

Try to identify the root cause

Sometimes, it’s not dementia that causes the anger, but the inability to verbalize other triggers or factors. Knowing some of the most common triggers can help identify them – or avoid them –reducing anger as well as the frequency and intensity of angry episodes.

Some of the most common triggers leading to an angry outburst include:

  • Hunger or thirst
  • Lack of sleep or poor sleep habits
  • Physical pain or discomfort
  • Not taking medication as prescribed (or suffering from medication side-effects)
  • Sensory overload (is the environment too loud, chaotic, confusing, too bright, etc.)
  • It is their “worst time of day,” (perhaps they need soothing/coping mechanisms)
  • Confusion (maybe you’re speaking too fast or instructions/sentences aren’t making sense)
  • Heightened emotional states in others (those with Alzheimer’s and dementia can have heightened sensitivity to the emotions of those around them)

Identifying and addressing these issues can go a long way towards soothing your loved one.

Remain as calm and compassionate as possible

Not easy to do, this tip is one of the most important. Your calm, slow and reassuring voice, gestures and actions (moving them to a quieter space, turning down loud volume controls, dimming the lights, etc.) de-escalate the situation. If you are unable to do this, take some deep slow breaths, or a time out (assuming the patient is safe/secure where s/she’s at), and see if someone else can relieve you for a bit.

Re-think your relationship

Often, caregivers do a great job of soothing – or not triggering – their clients. This is because they meet the individual where they are, and form a relationship accordingly. This is quite different from the experience of a spouse, child, grandchild, etc. In your case, you knew your loved one as they were, and the person you knew may no longer be actively present as often (or ever).

One of the best things you can do for yourself and a loved one with your loved one is to meet him/her where s/he’s at at the moment. This frees them from the stress of “do you remember…” or your own hurt/anger if you aren’t recognized – even as that may vacillate from one day to the next.

Read our post, Connecting With and Caring For a Loved One With Dementia for heartfelt recommendations on how to create new pathways of acceptance and connection.

Seek support when reducing anger is a necessity

For some, this may involve the help of a professional therapist who can listen to you vent in a neutral space, and who can provide tailored recommendations to “arm your toolkit,” as you learn how to manage both the one who is venting their anger, along with your own complex web of emotions – including stress, frustration, anger, and even grief.

We also recommend joining an Alzheimer’s/dementia support group. In addition to commiserating (as well as laughing, crying and celebrating) with those who can personally identify with your experience, these groups offer invaluable advice and recommendations.

Prioritize Safety

It’s easy to prioritize your loved one’s wellbeing and ability to remain at home at the expense of everyone’s safety. However, this doesn’t do anyone any favors. Safety for the one you love or care for – as well as your own safety – must always come first.

Have a list at the ready of “first-responders,” who are willing to come at a moment’s notice if needed. If physical safety is at risk, call 9-1-1, and let the dispatcher(s) know that the individual has dementia and is acting aggressively. They will alert the professional first-responders, who are trained in how to de-escalate these situations with the least amount of threat or harm.

We Can Help You With Reducing Anger

Are you having a hard time managing the care required for your loved one with dementia as a result of his/her anger, aggression or violence? Contact us here at HomeAide Home Care online, or give us a call at 510-247-1200. We have decades of experience providing compassionate care for memory care patients.