Pets For Seniors: How About A Low-Maintenance Fish?

pets for seniors how about a low maintenance fish

Multiple studies show that seniors benefit from pet ownership. However, owning a pet isn’t always that easy – and it can even be dangerous.

The most common pets for seniors – dogs and cats – require daily brushing and feeding, not to mention regular exercise, and senior pet owners may not be able to accommodate those needs. Plus, dogs and cats also pose trip and fall hazards for their senior owners, meaning the pet winds up doing more home than good.

The solution? Consider getting a pet fish!

Fish that can live in a bowl or very small tank

There are a range of fish that do quite well living in a fish bowl or very small tank. These include:

  • Bettas. Bettas (also called Japanese fighting fish) are beautiful, small and have flowing tails. They’re available in variety of colors but remember to keep them solo as they will fight their bowl companion to the death. Bettas are very clean so water changes and bowl cleaning is required less often.
  • Goldfish. These are America’s most common pet fish – and fancy tailed goldfish are the most attractive variety. They can live in groups but you want to make sure the bowl is large enough for the number of fish you’ve purchased. Be aware that goldfish are messy eaters and their water gets cloudy quickly so these aren’t a great option unless the senior, a family member or a caregiver clean the bowl regularly.
  • Guppies. Wild-type guppies are about as hearty as it gets – being known to thrive in minimal amounts of water (although a full bowl is optimal). They come in diverse color varieties – including metallic colors – and are happiest with company. Just make sure you purchase the same sex or else you’ll have guppy babies before too long.

Other fish that do well in bowls or small aquariums include:

  • Regal white cloud minnows
  • Blind cave tetras
  • Salt and Pepper Corydoras
  • Zebra danios

Taking your senior loved one to the pet store is a fun outing, and you’ll enjoy looking at the array of freshwater fish available – as well as the store employees’ professional opinions and input.

Fish are low-maintenance pets for seniors

Often overlooked, and undervalued, fish make wonderful pets. The average, bowl- or tank-housed fish never needs to be exercised and only requires feeding once a day (in most cases). They often come right up to the bowl or tank sides when an owner approaches or talks to them (more on that later) and fish are less likely to argue or disobey their owners than most furry critters.

Here are some of the reason why low-maintenance fish make great pets for seniors:

They’re affordable pets for seniors

The total set-up costs for a bowl or very small tank, some rocks, the food and a fish or two is less than $50. A single container of fish food lasts for months, and the rocks and bowl never need to be replaced. Thus, fish are the cheapest pets around, making them affordable for seniors no matter how small their fixed income may be.

Fish don’t trip you or cause you to fall

Fall-related accidents are devastating for seniors – often leading to broken bones, hip replacements, costly hospital stays and traumatic brain injury. Unfortunately, dogs and cats (particularly small dogs) pose a significant tripping risks because they can get underfoot and cause seniors to lose their balance.

If you’re concerned about fall hazards and are working to create a senior-friendly home, pet fish are the perfect pets for seniors and will fit right into your plan.

Feeding requirements are basic (even for those with dementia)

Even seniors with memory issues can enjoy the company of a fish because most pet stores have “vacation feeding” options available. If the senior isn’t able to feed the fish once a day on their own – and there’s no in-home care provider available – vacation feeding tablets can be placed in the tank once a week, bi-monthly or once per month.

Fish are smarter than they get credit for

Odds are your senior loved one will be surprised how much pleasure s/he derives from the new pet fish. Fish are smarter than humans give them credit for. As this article on PetMD points out, “…fish actually have very good memories. Even the most basic fish tank inhabitants will start to show anticipation of meals on a regular basis.” Studies also show that pet fish can learn to complete mazes for food and can be trained to respond to a bell or a signal.

Other animals that can live in a small bowl or tank include certain species of freshwater snails, shrimp and African dwarf frogs.

Does your senior loved one need assistance with pet care or basic daily activities? Contact HomeAide Home Care and schedule a free, in-home assessment. We’ve provided high-quality, part- and full-time senior care services for hundreds of families around the Bay Area.

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