Arthritis Diet: What To Eat And What To Avoid

arthritis diet what to eat and what to avoid

Did you know the foods you eat can worsen your arthritis pain and inflammation? Adhering to an arthritis diet – nearly identical to an anti-inflammatory diet – can make a substantial difference in the swelling, stiffness, and pain commonly associated with arthritis. 

Whether you’re a senior, or you’re caregiving for a senior loved one in your life, it’s almost inevitable that arthritis will become a factor in your life at some point. According to USpharmacist.com, “OA is the leading cause of disability in individuals older than 65 years and affects 70% to 90% of those older than 75 years.” 

Knowing that it makes sense that any adults, 50 years and older, begin focusing on foods that reduce arthritis symptoms and flare-ups as a proactive self-care option. 

What Is An Arthritis Diet? 

The good news is that while an arthritis diet includes the dreaded word, “diet,” it is quite expansive and has far more to do with what you should be eating, than what you shouldn’t. Similarly, the foods and beverages known to increase inflammation, which exacerbates arthritis, are also triggers for a range of senior-related health conditions such as heart disease, high cholesterol, and type 2 diabetes.  

When you follow the dietary guidelines outlined by The Arthritis Foundation, you benefit your body in exponential ways. 

In a nutshell 

In a nutshell, the arthritis diet operates on the premise that “following a diet low in processed foods and saturated fat and rich in fruits, vegetables, fish, nuts and beans is great for your body.” 

In that way, the diet shares the same principles of the Mediterranean Diet, or the anti-inflammatory diet listed above. And, the great news is that while you may have to cut down on some of those sweet treats, there are plenty of delicious food products that are yours for the eating. 

Foods To Avoid (because they “feed” inflammation) 

The foods to avoid are pretty straightforward. They are the foods or beverages that “feed” inflammation, which leads to increase swelling, redness, stiffness, and joint pain. Chronic inflammation also compromises the immune system. 

The 9 food or beverage items most likely to trigger inflammation are: 

  • Sugar (this includes high-fructose corn syrup, cane sugar, fructose, sucrose, anything with an –ose suffix). Instead, switch to stevia, agave, or other sweeteners rated lower on the glycemic index
  • Saturated fats 
  • Trans fats 
  • Omega 6 Fatty Acids. While Omega 6s are essential in moderation, they’re toxic in large quantities or when out of balance with their Omega 3 companions. Omega 6s are found in most vegetable oils (so stick with olive oil) as well as mayonnaise and most salad dressings. 
  • White flour products (refined carbohydrates). 
  • MSG 
  • Gluten and casein (found in wheat and other grain products)  
  • Aspartame (the sweetener found in most sugar-free or diet products) 
  • Alcohol. Swapping out your favorite happy hour drink with one of our Mocktail Recipes can help you reduce your alcohol intake. 

While you don’t need to eliminate any of these items completely (unless your physician(s) states otherwise), taking stock and minimizing their intake can provide an immediate reduction in arthritis-related symptoms. 

Foods To Focus On 

Now, let’s move to the positive – the foods that taste great and are known to reduce inflammation (anti-inflammatory).  

Ultimately, it’s about consuming lots and lots of fresh fruits and veggies – preferably those grown locally and in season, so you benefit from maximum nutrients and flavor.  

The 12 best foods for arthritis, are: 

  • Fish. Particularly those high in Omega 3s, such as salmon, mackerel, sardines, and herring. 
  • Soy. Also high in Omega 3s, it’s best to use fresh soybeans, edamame or tofu. 
  • Healthy oils. Especially those high in Omega 3s, including extra-virgin olive, avocado, safflower, and walnut oils. 
  • Cherries 
  • Low-fat dairy products (milk, cheese, and yogurt) 
  • Broccoli 
  • Green tea 
  • Citrus Fruits 
  • Whole grain. As we mentioned above, swap whole grains and whole-wheat flour for processed white flours anywhere you can 
  • Beans 
  • Garlic 
  • Nuts. Lightly salted nuts are a healthier alternative to chips or crackers and they’re good for you, too. 

Visit arthritis.org’s post on these 12 Best Foods for Arthritis for more specifics about the ways these food items interact positively with your body to reduce inflammation. 

Need help with arthritis-specific meal support? 

There’s no denying that eating well, and regularly, is more challenging for seniors. From mobility issues to the energy and work required to shop for – and cook – meals, bare cupboards and an excess of processed snacks is one of the most common signs that seniors need more support to remain independently at home

Feeling Overwhelmed?

HomeAide Home Care provides meal support, grocery shopping and errand running, companionship services and other key home care services that help senior loved ones adhere to an arthritis diet. Contact us to learn more or to schedule a free, in-home assessment. 

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